St Therese of Lisieux

St Norbert's
Catholic Primary School

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Science

 

Recovery Statement of Intent

As part of our school’s phased recovery to science, new key knowledge and skills will be introduced and taught parallel to a prolonged period of revision. As new topics are covered, prior knowledge and skills will be reviewed. Using our experience and the experiences of the children during the Covid19  lockdown in a positive way. We will share a favourite experiment, or home science project and focus on the good of others sharing the inspiration of new and old and young innovators.  Through cross curricular well-being activities, children will begin to develop skills and knowledge of the wider scientific world around them.

 

It has been an unprecedented time for all of us, especially for our children and the excitement of starting school again is a huge step for all children. Covid has supported and promoted the importance of family and the world around them in a positive way and will be used to support transition. We will ensure we are supporting children to familiarise themselves with the school environment so that they can start to rebuild relationships with members of staff and their peers. The Science curriculum will provide opportunities for this in a variety of ways such as independent and group investigations. Using critical thinking to develop understanding and problem solving. Children will also be exposed to new vocabulary as well as familiar scientific words to help build any gaps in their understanding. Outdoor learning will be key in enabling children to explore their environment in a safe and happy way as we begin to embark on a program of recovery.

 

Science is the study of the world around us. Scientists learn about their subject by observing, describing, and experimenting. There are many subjects and branches of science. Some study outer space like astronomy. Other sciences study life (biology) or the earth (geology) or even matter and energy (physics).

By the end of year 1 pupils should be able to: identify common plants and trees and be able to comment on basic structures of plants and trees. Pupils should be able to name common animals including fish, understand the term carnivore, herbivores and omnivores and be able to draw and label basic body parts associated with each of the senses. Children should be able to identify everyday materials and describe simple properties of materials being able to group and compare based on simple properties. Children should be able to describe seasonal changes and weather associated with the seasons.

By the end of year 2 pupils should be able to: should be able to explore and compare the differences between things that are living, dead, and things that have never been alive. They should be able to understand habitats and microhabitats of living things and describe them, they should also be able to say how animals and plants rely on each other through food chains and sources of food. Year 2 children know how plants and seeds grow and what they need to keep them healthy. Pupils should understand how offspring grow into adults and what they need to survive, including the importance of exercise, hygiene and a balanced diet. Year 2 children should be able to compare materials and say why they are good for a particular purpose and describe properties using language such as squashing, bending, twisting and stretching.

By the end of year 3 pupils should be able to: identify and describe the functions of different parts of flowering plants e.g. roots, stem, leaves and flowers and be able to explore how air, light, water, nutrients from soil, and room to grow affect growth. Pupils should be able to say which parts of the plant are involved in pollination, seed formation and seed dispersal and investigate the way in which water is transported within plants. Children should be able to identify that animals, including humans, the right types and amount of nutrition they need, and the fact that that they cannot make their own food. They should have knowledge of the fact that humans and some other animals have skeletons and muscles for support, protection and movement. Year 3 pupils should be able to compare and group together different kinds of rocks on the basis of their appearance and simple physical properties. They should be able to use simple terms to describe how fossils are formed when things that have lived and are trapped within rock. Children should be able to say how soils are made from rocks and organic matter. In lower KS2 pupils should be able to recognise that they need light in order to see things and that dark is the absence of light and understand how reflective surfaces reflect light. They should recognise that light from the sun can be dangerous and that there are ways to protect their eyes. Children should understand the term opaque and how these objects block light. They should also have an understanding of how shadows are formed and the patterns that are made when the light is blocked by such an object. Year 2 pupils should be able to compare how things move on different surfaces and notice that some forces need contact between two objects, but magnetic forces can act at a distance. They should be able to describe through observation how magnets attract or repel each other and attract some materials and not others. Children should be able to compare and group a variety of everyday materials on the basis of whether they are attracted to a magnet, and identify some magnetic materials.  They should be able to describe magnets as having two poles and be able to predict whether two magnets will attract or repel each other, depending on which poles are facing.

By the end of year 4 pupils should be able to: recognise that living things can be grouped in different ways and use classification keys to help group, identify and name a variety of living things in their local and wider environment they should be able to recognise that environments can change and that this can at times pose dangers to living things. Pupils should be able to describe simple functions of basic parts of the digestive system in humans identify the different types of teeth in humans and their functions. Children should be able to construct and interpret a variety of food chains, identifying producers, predators and prey. Year 4 children should have an understanding of how to compare and group materials, according to whether they are solids, liquids or gases and should be able to describe how some materials change state when they are heated or cooled. They should acquire skills as to how to measure or research the temperature at which this happens in degrees Celsius (°C) and explain the processes of evaporation and condensation in the water cycle and relate this to the rate of evaporation with temperature. Pupils should be able to identify how sounds are made through vibration and that vibrations from sounds travel through a medium to the ear. Children should understand the pattern between the pitch of a sound and features of the object that produced it along with the volume of a sound and the strength of the vibrations that produced it. They should be able to describe how distance from the source decreases the volume of the sound.

Year 4 children should be able to name common appliances that run on electricity and be able to construct basic electrical circuits using cells, wires, bulbs, switches and buzzers. They should be aware of whether or not a lamp will light in a simple series circuit, based on whether or not the lamp is part of a complete loop with a battery. Children should understand that a switch opens and closes a circuit and link this with whether or not a lamp lights or not. Year 4 pupils should have an understanding of conductors and insulators and be able to say why metals are good conductors.

By the end of year 5 pupils should be able to: talk about the differences in the life cycles mammals, amphibians, insects and birds and be able to talk about reproduction in some plants and animals and have an awareness of how old age changes humans. Pupils should be able to use properties of materials such as hardness, solubility, transparency, conductivity (electrical and thermal), and response to magnets to group materials and be able to compare materials based on these properties. Children should be able to describe how some materials are dis-solvable and how they can be made solid again. The should have an understanding of how solids, liquids and gas mixtures might be separated using filtering, sieving and evaporating. Children should be able to use knowledge and evidence for a fair test and understand that dissolving, mixing and changes of state are reversible changes. Children should also know that when this process forms a new material that this is not usually reversible. Year 5 children should be able to talk about the movement of the Earth, and other planets, relative to the Sun in the solar system, understand the movement of the Moon relative to the Earth they should be able to describe the Sun, Earth and Moon and describe how the rotation of the earth creates day and night.  use the idea of the Earth’s rotation to explain day and night and the apparent movement of the sun across the sky. Pupils should be able to explain the force of gravity, have an understanding of air, water resistance and friction, and understand how the use of mechanisms enable a smaller force to have a greater effect.

By the end of year 6 pupils should be able to: talk about how through observations microorganisms, plants and animals can be classified and be able to explain their reasons for classification.  They should be able to name parts of the circulatory system and talk about the job of the heart, blood vessels and blood. Children should understand the need for a balanced diet and the impact of an unhealthy lifestyle. Year 6 pupils should have knowledge of how water is transported within animals, including humans. They should have an understanding of evolution and inheritance. Children should understand that over time living things change and that information about the past can be found in fossils. Children should understand that living things produce offspring of the same kind, but normally offspring vary and are not identical to their parents. They should also be able talk about how animals and plants adapt to their environment (evolution).  Year 6 pupils should know that light travels in straight lines and that light is reflected r given out by objects so that they can be seen. Children should be able to say that light enters the eye through a light source enabling us to see the object. Children should also be able to describe how shadows are formed and describe how the shapes are produced. Year 6 children should be able to say how the voltage of a cell related to the brightness of a lamp or the loudness of a buzzer and be able to present diagrams of circuits using the correct symbols.