St Therese of Lisieux

St Norbert's
Catholic Primary School

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Physical Education

 

 

Recovery Physical Education Statement

At St. Norbert’s Primary school we consider Physical Education to be a very important part of every school day. It is essential that everyone has at least one hour’s daily physical activity in order to maintain a healthy well-being balance. As part of our recovery curriculum plan for Physical education we have embraced a greater emphasis on restoring children’s well-being and ‘feel-good’ factor through a range of physical activities throughout the day and across each week. We promote physical exercise throughout our school day’s enabling all children to take part in mini-exercise bursts of 10-15 minutes; complete refresh brain breaks or even take a stroll around the daily mile. All physical activity is important and we advocate that this is coupled with both a healthy sleep pattern for your children and a healthy balanced diet. Physical exercise helps our bodies sleep at bedtime and recharge our energy levels in order to make good choices, learn effectively and enjoy life. Exercise promotes chemicals in our brains which make us feel good. We take time to share and discuss our feelings before and after exercise allowing time for all pupils to engage, share and relax through physical activity.

Not everyone enjoys active sports however, there are many different forms of exercise we share at St. Norbert’s which allow children to engage, develop skills and feel success. Keeping active is a great opportunity for all our children to share and have fun – playing Covid safe games which raise the heart rate and deepen the breathing ensure that the ‘Feel-good’ endorphins are released and we can all have fun together. We encourage all our children to be creative to get your heart pumping fast!

As part of our Physical education curriculum plan we have linked this through a Healthy Eating program, sharing ideas and information to encourage children to be healthier in their food choices. There is a saying that we are what we eat – the food we eat can affect our mood and often how we behave so we enthuse children to try to eat healthily and enjoy a range of food groups, in turn this enables a fully-active and happy child to engage in learning at school. We also encourage all children to Stay hydrated – drinking lots of water is also good for you, it is recommended that you drink 6 – 8 glasses each day and all children are able to bring their drinks bottles into the classrooms and keep them in easy reach on their desks. Physical Education and engagement in exercise which raises the heart rate enables your children to partake fully in the range of activities the school day has to offer.

 

 

Physical Education

 

The purpose of physical education is to provide a high-quality curriculum that inspires all pupils to succeed and excel in competitive sport and other physically-demanding activities. It should provide opportunities for pupils to become physically confident in a way which supports their health and fitness. Opportunities to compete in sport and other activities build character and help to embed values such as fairness and respect.

National Curriculum Programme of Study

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/national-curriculum-in-england-physical-education-programmes-of-study

By the end of Year 1

  • Pupils can perform and develop basic movements including running, jumping and hopping, throw and catch basic equipment including a ball, bean bag and quoit and use some accuracy to roll a ball along a line or towards a target.
  • Track objects that are rolled and be able to pick them up as they slow down.
  • Pupils can say how to warm their bodies up before exercising.
  • In gymnastics pupils are able to hold simple shapes, create a series of movements and link actions together in a sequence using different speeds and levels.
  • In dance pupils are able to develop balance and co-ordination and perform a piece that encapsulates simple movement patterns. 

By the end of Year 2

  • Pupils develop skills in order to throw and catch a small ball, accurately send an object by rolling it and master basic movements including running, jumping and hopping.
  • Pupils use agility and co-ordination and apply these to a range of activities including starting to develop spatial awareness within a game situation.  
  • In gymnastics pupils can balance confidently on a piece of apparatus with agility and co-ordination, roll with control and link a sequence of movements including balances and jumps.
  • In dance pupils create different movements and body shapes to perform a dance motif inspired by a stimulus.
  • Pupils are also able to work collaboratively and co-operatively with a partner or small group.

By the end of Year 3

  • Pupils develop skills in order to send and receive objects with accuracy, keep possession of an object when not under pressure and develop fielding skills.
  • In gymnastics pupils are able to link shapes and partner balances within a sequence, as well as hold and control different balances in the air.
  • Pupils are able to link movements together including, steps, jumps and leapsand perform movements and balances including jumps, rolls, vaults, lunges, handstands and cartwheels.
  • In dance pupils create and perform imaginative movements inspired by a stimulus, linking actions and showing awareness of others when working in a group.
  • Pupils are also able to use improvisation to create movements when working with a partner.

By the end of Year 4

  • Pupils are able to develop skills in order to keep possession of an object and send and receive an object within a game situation.
  • Pupils are able to use a piece of equipment to send an object accurately including striking a ball.
  • Pupils are also able to field within a game situation.
  • In gymnastics pupils are able to perform a range of movements including jumps, leaps and pivots and balances including jumps, rolls, vaults, lunges, handstands and cartwheels in order to perform a more complex sequence within a pairing or small group.
  • In dance pupils respond to a stimulus in order to create and combine movement phrases and skills that are performed within a sequence to create mood,
  • Pupils are introduced to outdoor and adventurous activity that they can partake in individually.
  • To be able to swim 25m using a variety of strokes.

 

By the end of Year 5

 

  • Pupils are able to send and receive an object and use it to gain an advantage to keep possession within a competitive situation, as well as keep control of any object, using any piece of equipment to gain an advantage in a game situation.  
  • In gymnastics pupils combine travel and dynamic balances holding weight on their hands in a controlled way, as well as in unison or canon throughout a sequence.
  • Pupils plan a sequence of movements including jumps, leaps, rolls, squats, vaults, handstands, cartwheels and round off creatively in a pair and individually.
  • In dance pupils respond to a stimulus creating and combining a range of techniques and movement phrases and skills related to different styles of dance.
  • Pupils can perform movements based on a character or appropriate to the style and mood of the dance.
  • Pupils take part in outdoor and adventurous activity within a team, developing navigation skills.
  • In swimming pupils are able to perform and use some strokes effectively and begin to perform safe self-rescue techniques.

 

By the end of Year 6 

 

  • Pupils are able to send and receive an object within a competitive situation to outwit an opponent and gain advantage.
  • Pupils are able to use tactics when fielding in order to gain advantage within competitive sports.
  • In gymnastics pupils work in a larger group to choreograph and perform a gymnastics routine to music.
  • Pupils are able to combine travel and dynamic balances in unison or canon throughout a sequence including a variety of jumps, leaps, rolls, squats, vaults, handstands, cartwheels and round offs in quick succession.
  • Sequences use symmetry and asymmetry at different levels using a range of equipment.
  • In dance pupils are able to respond to a stimulus responding freely combining movement phrases and skills in a controlled way with accuracy and consistency.
  • Pupils are able to represent objects and actions using a range of dance phrases and analyse their own and peers performance.
  • In outdoor and adventurous activity pupils partake both individually and with a team using a map to navigate and take leadership of a small group of children.
  • In swimming pupils perform and use a range of strokes effectively and are able to perform safe self-rescue in different water-based situations.