St Therese of Lisieux

St Norbert's
Catholic Primary School

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Design and Technology 

 

Design and Technology Recovery Statement

As part of a phased recovery to design and technology, new key knowledge and skills will be introduced and taught parallel, will be a prolonged period of revision. As new topics are approach, prior knowledge and skills will be reviewed. Using our experience of covid lockdown in a positive way, we will share a favourite recipe, or home diy project and focus on the good of others sharing the inspiration of engineers, architects, designers, chiefs and budding young creators.  Through cross curricular well-being activities, children will begin to develop skills and knowledge of the wider world around them.

Intent

At St. Norbert’s lessons are planned sequentially across year groups to enable coherent and logical progression of key concepts with particular attention to what has come previously and what will come next. Our creative curriculum aims to inspire children through a broad range of practical experiences to create innovative designs which solve real and relevant problems within a variety of different contexts. This iterative process encourages children to identify real and relevant problems, critically evaluate existing products and then take risks and innovate when designing and creating solutions to the problems. As part of the iterative process, time is built in to reflect, evaluate and improve on prototypes using design criteria throughout to support this process. Opportunities are provided for children to evaluate key events and individuals who have helped shape the world, showing the real impact of design and technology on the wider environment and helping to inspire children to become the next generation of innovators.

Implementation

Design and Technology skills are built into lessons, following an iterative process. However, this is not to say that this structure should be followed rigidly: it allows for the revision of ideas to become part of good practice and ultimately helps to build a depth to children's understanding. Through revisiting and consolidating skills, children build on prior knowledge alongside introducing new skills, knowledge and challenge. Specific lessons offer structure and narrative. The revision and introduction of key vocabulary is built into lessons. Children will be taught to use this key vocabulary when using materials and resources.  Teachers will have accurate design and technology subject knowledge and feel confident delivering this to the children.

Through lessons, we intend to inspire pupils to develop a love of Design and Technology and see how it has helped shaped the ever-evolving technological world they live in.

Impact

Teachers will be able to teach key skills. Children will be able to evaluate throughout the process. Design and technology technical vocabulary will be displayed, spoken and used by all learners. We want to ensure that Design and Technology is loved by pupils across school, therefore encouraging them to want to continue building on this wealth of skills and understanding, now and in the future. Impact can also be measured through key questioning skills built into lessons, child-led assessment such as pupil interviews and summative assessments aimed at targeting next steps in learning.

 

 
Advent 1
Advent 2
Lent 1
Lent 2
Pentecost 1
Pentecost 2
Year 1
 
Can you create a strong bridge across the moat?
Design a product that has a purpose and are aimed at an intended user;
with help, measure and mark out;
cut, shape and score materials with some accuracy;
assemble, join and combine materials
explain positives and things to improve for existing products;
identify strengths and possible changes they might make to refine their existing design;
evaluate their products and ideas against their simple design criteria;
 
Norbert Bear needs to stay dry in the rain?
Use their knowledge of existing products and their own experience to help generate their ideas;
use a range of materials and components, including textiles;
with help, measure and mark out;
demonstrate how to cut, shape and join fabric to make a simple product;
manipulate fabrics in simple ways to create the desired effect;
use a basic running stich;
explain positives and things to improve for existing products;
as they work, start to identify strengths and possible changes they might make to refine their existing design;
 
Food
Design a product that have a purpose and are aimed at an intended user;
with support, follow a simple plan or recipe;
begin to select from a range of hand tools and equipment, such as graters, zesters, safe knives, juicer;
use a range of materials and components, including food ingredients;
cut, peel and grate ingredients, including measuring and weighing ingredients using measuring cups with support;
begin to use simple finishing techniques to improve the appearance of their product, such as adding
simple decorations.
evaluate their products and ideas against their simple design criteria.
Year 2
 
During the Great Fire of London the houses burnt down very quickly. Can you make a house that would burn slowly, allowing people time to get out?  Whose house will burn the slowest?
Design a product that has a purpose and are aimed at an intended user;
explain how their products will look and work
with help, measure and mark out;
cut, shape and score materials with some accuracy;
assemble, join and combine materials
explain positives and things to improve for existing products;
 
 
Can you create a recipe with ingredients grown in Kenya?
Use their knowledge of existing products and their own experience to help generate their ideas;
with support, follow a simple plan or recipe;
begin to select from a range of hand tools and equipment, such as graters, zesters, safe knives, juicer;
with help, measure and mark out;
cut, peel and grate ingredients, including measuring and weighing ingredients using measuring cups;
begin to use simple finishing techniques to improve the appearance of their product, such as adding
simple decorations.
evaluate their products and ideas against their simple design criteria
 
Textiles
Use their knowledge of existing products and their own experience to help generate their ideas;
select from a range of materials, textiles and components according to their characteristics;
with help, measure and mark out;
demonstrate how to cut, shape and join fabric to make a simple product;
manipulate fabrics in simple ways to create the desired effect;
use a basic running stich;
explain positives and things to improve for existing products;
 
 
Year 3
 
Can you make a Shaduf lift the most amount of water? 
Identify the design features
use knowledge of existing products to generate ideas;
design products with a clear purpose.
learn to use a range of tools and equipment safely,
use a wider range of materials and components,
measure and mark out to the nearest cm and millimetre;
cut, shape and score materials with some degree of accuracy;
assemble, join and combine material and components with some degree of accuracy;
evaluate their product against their original design criteria;
 
 
What recipes can you create from plants?
Identify the design
use their knowledge of existing products
learn to use a range of tools and equipment safely,
follow hygiene procedures;
use a heat source to cook ingredients
use a range of techniques such as mashing, whisking, crushing, grating, cutting, kneading and baking;
prepare ingredients using appropriate cooking utensils;
measure and weigh ingredients to the nearest gram and millilitre;
start to independently follow a recipe;
evaluate their product against their original design criteria;
 
Textiles
Identify the design
use their knowledge of existing products
carefully select from a range of tools.
use a range of tools and equipment safely,
measure and mark out to the nearest cm and millimetre;
demonstrate how to measure, cut, shape and join fabric with some accuracy to make a simple product;
join textiles with an appropriate sewing technique;
begin to select and use different and appropriate finishing techniques to improve the appearance of a product such as hemming, tie-dye, fabric paints and digital graphics.
evaluate their product against their original design criteria;
Year 4
 
Design and make a torch that can be switched on and off.
Identify the design features
use knowledge of existing products to generate ideas;
annotated sketches and cross-sectional drawings to develop and communicate ideas;
select from a range of materials
learn to use a range of tools and equipment safely,
use a wider range of materials and components,
measure and mark out to the nearest cm and millimetre;
cut, shape and score materials with some degree of accuracy;
assemble, join and combine material and components with some degree of accuracy;
make and represent simple electrical circuits,
evaluate their product against their original design criteria;
 
Food - The Viking diet was a model of efficiency and innovation in a time when cooks had to make the most out of some very limited ingredients. Can you cook some tasty dishes with very limited ingredients?
 
Identify the design
use their knowledge of existing products
learn to use a range of tools and equipment safely, appropriately and accurately and learn to follow hygiene procedures;
use a heat source to cook ingredients
use a range of techniques such as mashing, whisking, crushing, grating, cutting, kneading and baking;
prepare ingredients using appropriate cooking utensils;
measure and weigh ingredients to the nearest gram and millilitre;
start to independently follow a recipe;
explore what ingredients products are made from and suggest reasons for this;
evaluate their product against their original design criteria;
 
Textiles
Identify the design
use their knowledge of existing products
carefully select from a range of tools.
select from a range of materials
use a range of tools and equipment safely,
measure and mark out to the nearest cm and millimetre;
demonstrate how to measure, cut, shape and join fabric with some accuracy to make a simple product;
join textiles with an appropriate sewing technique;
begin to select and use different and appropriate finishing techniques to improve the appearance of a product such as hemming, tie-dye, fabric paints and digital graphics.
evaluate their product against their original design criteria;
Year 5
 
Textiles - Make a parachute that will fall slowly to the ground. Will yours take the longest amount of time to land?
Use their knowledge of a broad range of existing products to help generate their ideas;
independently take exact measurements and mark out, to within 1 millimetre;
cut a range of materials with precision and accuracy;
demonstrate how to measure, make a seam allowance, tape, pin, cut, shape and join fabric with precision to make a more complex product;
join textiles using a greater variety of stitches, such as backstitch, whip stitch, blanket stitch;
critically evaluate the quality of design,
 
 
Can you create a boat that can withstand a small storm?
Use research to inform and develop detailed design criteria
use annotated sketches, cross-sectional drawings and exploded diagrams select from a wide range of tools and equipment,
select from a range of materials and components
independently take exact measurements and mark out, to within 1 millimetre;
cut a range of materials with precision and accuracy;
shape and score materials with precision and accuracy;
assemble, join and combine materials and components with accuracy;
critically evaluate the quality of design,
 
 
Food
Use research to inform and develop detailed design
demonstrate how to prepare and cook a variety of predominantly savoury dishes safely and hygienically including, where appropriate, the use of a heat source;
demonstrate how to use a range of cooking techniques, such as griddling, grilling, frying and boiling;
adapt and refine recipes by adding or substituting one or more ingredients to change the appearance, taste, texture and aroma;
alter methods, cooking times and/or temperatures;
measure accurately and calculate ratios of ingredients to scale up or down from a recipe;
independently follow a recipe.
evaluate their ideas and products against the original design criteria, making changes as needed.
Year 6
 
To make a phone case that can hold …
Use their knowledge of a broad range of existing products to help generate their ideas;
independently take exact measurements and mark out, to within 1 millimetre;
cut a range of materials with precision and accuracy;
demonstrate how to measure, make a seam allowance, tape, pin, cut, shape and join fabric with precision to make a more complex product;
join textiles using a greater variety of stitches, such as backstitch, whip stitch, blanket stitch;
critically evaluate the quality of design.
 
Can you put on a shoe box Show?
Use research to inform and develop detailed design criteria
use annotated sketches, cross-sectional drawings and exploded diagrams select from a wide range of tools and equipment,
select from a range of materials and components
independently take exact measurements and mark out, to within 1 millimetre;
cut a range of materials with precision and accuracy;
shape and score materials with precision and accuracy;
assemble, join and combine materials and components with accuracy;
critically evaluate the quality of design.
 
Food
Use research to inform and develop detailed design
demonstrate how to prepare and cook a variety of predominantly savoury dishes safely and hygienically including, where appropriate, the use of a heat source;
demonstrate how to use a range of cooking techniques, such as griddling, grilling, frying and boiling;
adapt and refine recipes by adding or substituting one or more ingredients to change the appearance, taste, texture and aroma;
alter methods, cooking times and/or temperatures;
measure accurately and calculate ratios of ingredients to scale up or down from a recipe;
independently follow a recipe.